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INFECTION PREVENTION ment and in any unit within a healthcare


facility. “Our Environmental Services (EVS), Infection Prevention, Surgery, and Cath Lab departments formed a team and worked closely together to identify units within the hospital on which to focus robot utilization,” said Brawner. “We selected hospital EVS techs, surgical techs, and cath-lab RNs to be trained as Xenex super-user representatives. These individuals trained users to run the ro- bots in selected areas. Fourteen Norman


Regional Health System employees are super users, and 20 are users. The Xenex team did a great job of training our team members how to run the robots, and they worked closely with the team to track utilization.” Results: At the end of one year, the C. diff, MRSA, and VRE infection rates dropped by 36 percent, resulting in a $250,000 savings for the hospital, including the cost of robots and labor to operate them.


Mercy Health St. Anne Hospital Toledo, OH


Mercy Health St. Anne Hospital, a 100-bed community hospital in Toledo, Ohio, is part of the Mercy Health system, the largest health system in Ohio, serving Ohio and Kentucky. Lisa A. Beauch BSN, RN, CAPA, CPAN, CIC, Infection Prevention Regional Manager – Toledo/Lima, stated, “We want all hospital-acquired infections to be elimi- nated but chose to focus onC. diff infections because it was the one infection that was higher than our predicted number. We were 40 percent above predicted.” What they did:Mercy Health’s campaign to reduce C. diff began in the fall 2015 and continues to this day. Beauch explained the steps toward improved numbers began with getting administration and depart- ments to be involved on board. “The project’s key departments were administration, EVS, phar- macy, lab, nursing, and infection prevention/quality staff. With administrative support, we began an antimicrobial stewardship program, standardized cleaning processes, educated on proper testing and specimen collection, audited compliance with pol- icy, and heightened awareness. We be- gan using the Clorox Optimum-UV light in December 2015. We implemented a ‘days-since-last-infec- tion’ announcement on our daily safety call to keep up awareness.” Results:“We went 341 days without a hospital-acquired C. diffand ended 2017 at 70 percent below predicted,” said Beauch.


Clorox


Healthcare’s Optimum- UV System


Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare Utica, NY


Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare is a 160-bed acute-care facility, an affiliate of Mo- hawk Valley Health System in Central New York, serving a variety of patient populations including oncology, dialysis, pediatric, maternal child health, and im- munocompromised. What they did: “Our facility had an unacceptably high rate of hospital-onset C. diff infection,” explained Heather L. Bernard, DNP, RN, CIC, FAPIC, Director of Infection Prevention, Mohawk Valley Health System, St. Elizabeth Medical Center. The rate of infection was 19.09 infections per 10,000 patient-days, prior to the interventions.


20 March 2018 • HEALTHCARE PURCHASING NEWS • hpnonline.com Page 22


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